Gateway I

C&S BIO M184. Introduction to Computational and Systems Biology

Units: 2

(Same as Bioengineering M184 and Computer Science M184.) Lecture, two hours; outside study, four hours. Enforced requisites: one course from Civil Engineering M20, Computer Science 31, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M20, or Program in Computing 10A, and Mathematics 3B or 31B. Survey course designed to introduce students to computational and systems modeling and computation in biology and medicine, providing motivation, flavor, culture, and cutting-edge contributions in computational biosciences and aiming for more informed basis for focused studies by students with computational and systems biology interests. Presentations by individual UCLA researchers discussing their active computational and systems biology research. P/NP grading.

Note: Offered Fall quarter–students typically take in the Fall of their 2nd or 3rd years. Students wishing to take C&S BIO M184 in Fall of their 2nd year should plan to take COM SCI 31 or COMPTNG 10A during their 1st year.

Gateway II

C&S BIO M185. Research Opportunities in Computational and Systems Biology

Units: 4

(Same as Computer Science M185.) Lecture, two hours; discussion, two hours. Requisites: course M184, Mathematics 32B, 33A, 33B, Life Sciences 4. Introduction to interdisciplinary laboratory research methods and research opportunities in computational and systems biology to prepare and initiate students for active engagement in research. Presentation of potential projects by faculty members and student visits to individual laboratories and participation in ongoing projects. P/NP or letter grading.

Note: Offered Winter quarter–students typically take in Winter of their 2nd or 3rd year.

Probability

STATS 100A. Introduction to Probability

Units: 4

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: Mathematics 32B, 33A. Not open to students with credit for Electrical Engineering 131A or Mathematics 170A; open to graduate students. Students may receive credit for only two of following: course 100A, former course 110A, Biostatistics 100A. Probability distributions, random variables, vectors, and expectation. P/NP or letter grading.

OR

MATH 170A. Probability Theory I

Units: 4

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 32B, 33A, 131A. Not open to students with credit for course 170E, Electrical and Computer Engineering 131A, or Statistics 100A. Rigorous presentation of probability theory based on real analysis. Probability space, probability and conditional probability, independence, Bayes’ rule, discrete and continuous random variables and their distributions, expectation, moments and variance, conditional distribution and expectation, weak law of large numbers. P/NP or letter grading.

OR

EC ENGR 131A. Probability and Statistics

Units: 4

(Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 131A.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, 10 hours. Requisites: course 102 (enforced), Mathematics 32B, 33B. Introduction to basic concepts of probability, including random variables and vectors, distributions and densities, moments, characteristic functions, and limit theorems. Applications to communication, control, and signal processing. Introduction to computer simulation and generation of random events. Letter grading.

Note: Consult the Schedule of Classes for updated course offerings.

Statistics

STATS 100B. Introduction to Mathematical Statistics

Units: 4

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 100A or Mathematics 170A or 170E. Survey sampling, estimation, testing, data summary, one- and two-sample problems. P/NP or letter grading.

OR

BIOSTAT 100A. Introduction to Biostatistics

Units: 4

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; laboratory, one hour. Preparation: one biological or physical sciences course. Suitable for juniors/seniors. Students who have completed courses in statistics may enroll only with consent of instructor. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 110A. Introduction to methods and concepts of statistical analysis. Sampling situations, with special attention to those occurring in biological sciences. Topics include distributions, tests of hypotheses, estimation, types of error, significance and confidence levels, sample size. P/NP or letter grading.

Note: Consult the Schedule of Classes for updated course offerings.

Capstone I

C&S BIO 150. Biological Modeling: Mathematical and Computational Approaches

Units: 5

Lecture, four hours; laboratory, three hours. Requisites: Life Sciences 7A, 7B, 7C, and 30A and 30B, or Mathematics 33A and 33B, with grades of C or better. Recommended Requisites: Physics 1A, 1B, and 1C, or 5A, 5B, and 5C, with grades of C or better. Students learn how to translate their biological knowledge and intuition into mathematical equations and computer simulations, and how to interpret and glean biological insights from quantitative results and predictions. Review and integration of core mathematical and computational approaches in novel ways. Students gain experience translating and intuition about systems through many examples across range of biological levels, such as predator-prey, disease transmission, cancer initiation, cell migration, neural systems, vascular networks, sleep, drug interactions, gene expression, and more. Students learn how to manipulate data, basics of coding, and how to instantiate their mathematical models and biological intuition through numerical solutions and simulations. Letter grading.

Note: Offered Spring quarter–students typically take in Spring of their 2nd or 3rd year.

Capstone II

C&S BIO M187. Research Communication in Computational and Systems Biology

Units: 4

(Same as Bioengineering CM187 and Computer Science CM187.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course M186. Closely directed, interactive, and real research experience in active quantitative systems biology research laboratory. Direction on how to focus on topics of current interest in scientific community, appropriate to student interests and capabilities. Critiques of oral presentations and written progress reports explain how to proceed with search for research results. Major emphasis on effective research reporting, both oral and written. Letter grading.

Note: Offered Spring quarter–students typically take in Spring of their 3rd or 4th year (the year after they completed C&S BIO 150).